Saturday, January 12, 2008

"All that is necessary for evil to succeed is that good men do nothing."

“The most we can do is to accept the situation and hope that it will improve.”

Linora Low, on what can be done to improve Malaysia.

Really?

7 comments:

Aronil said...

Wow!!! I got a featured post hehe

Susanna said...

You know, the thing that irks me most is how most people just resort to migration as the solution to things they're unhappy about here. I don't know whether you share my sentiment or not in this respect.

But anyways, I'm just dropping by to say hi :)

Fikri said...

To Aronil: Yeah, you did :> I was hoping that your comment can spark some kind of debate on this.

To Su: That's a long hi :> I think going abroad is fine, so long as people do it for the right reasons. If it's to 'escape' the country, for example, I think if they've tried everything they can to improve things, but if it's ineffective, then it's natural to think that the grass is greener on the other side. But if they jump in straight abroad without trying to effect a change, then I don't agree with that.

After all, you'll be moving to a country where you don't even exist in the political system. Which...well, it has to suck, I should imagine :>

teMMe said...

Nothing will ever improve if we keep expecting other people to come up with solutions and implementing them.

Not much good ever comes out of politics talk over coffee.

Fikri said...

It depends on the people that we depend on :) I suppose the beginning of anything is an idea, and ideas can be wrought, exchanged, enhanced, evaluated and incinerated over a cup of coffee (or teh tarik, if you will).

But as a character from Star Wars once said...well begun, is only half done. :> The question is desire, and the will to see it through. If people don't have any ideas, or aren't willing to try and affect change in the small ways that they can, then they have no right to criticise. We're talking in the context of government here, but that also applies to many other things in many other countries.

Rawr.

Aronil said...

Heh.. don't think there was much of debate i sparked.. but in anycase...maybe it is not so much of running away, but it is tiring to fight for what could be a losing battle.. All I'm saying is that as individuals we pick our battles.. and like Dr Pat says we have the habitus, which causes us to look out for "number one". If i were someone in the government sure maybe so, but i'm not and i highly doubt they would listen.. or would they?..

Fikri said...

That's the thing, Lin. Looking out for number is a priority for many people, and I have nothing against it. I am currently at that stage too.

But by the same token, the sort of change that I think you're looking for is total and immediate. Nothing ever happens that fast, even in countries like America or Australia. Perhaps people in governments might not listen, but there are always others out there who might share the same view. The things that we can do is not much compared to others, perhaps, but it is something. We can vote, and by voting for the party you believe in, you have a say in the running of the country. That's one small thing that we can do, and the bigger picture is always made up of the details. Let's put it another way: I don't think things would have turned out the way it did for the blacks in America if Rosa Parks gave up her seat on that bus.

And fighting a losing battle? Who wants to win a battle, anyway? I'm fighting to win the war :)